When do infants start operant learning

Operant learning is a technical way of saying, "cause and effect learning."  This type of learning accounts for the vast majority of human behavior. We learn to do the things that work for us. We learn to use a key to start a car. We learn to use a spoon to eat. We learn to walk [page 2] so that we can move about. These are all examples of behaving in a way (cause) that it produces the desire outcome (effect).

 

Research studies with infants 1 to 3 days old show that an infant can learn to change the rate he sucks on his pacifier to view a picture he wants. In the first 2 weeks, infants learn the sight, smell, and touch of the breast and latch on for milk. Right from birth, infants are learning how to control the world around them. It is slow at first, because there are few things that an infant can do (other than cry which is generally a reflex an not a manipulative behavior). 

 nbsp;

Research studies with infants 1 to 3 days old show that an infant can learn to change the rate he sucks on his pacifier to view a picture he wants. In the first 2 weeks, infants learn the sight, smell, and touch of the breast and latch on for milk. Right from birth, infants are learning how to control the world around them. It is slow at first, because there are few things that an infant can do (other than cry which is generally a reflex an not a manipulative behavior).

&

Infants need lots of opportunity to interact with the world around them. They need things to see and things to touch. They need people to interact with them with smiles and happy voices. Infants enter this world with all their senses functioning, and start the learning journey of a lifetime. Right from the start, infants are constantly learning to interact with their world. They are learning cause and effect. Infants are am