Misophonia

Misophonia literally means "hatred of sounds" and describes the involuntary anger, annoyance or rage some people feel when they hear other people eating, breathing, coughing or producing other ordinary sounds.  Misophonia is also known as 4S, which stands for Selective Sounds Sensitivity Syndrome.  Some children with misophonia have also had a "hatred of smells" as well.

 

Misophonia seems to have a component of associating sounds with aversive experiences. The sound may be irritating, but can be tolerated in many situations and from many people. When the sound is paired with unpleasant experiences, especially with a specific individual, the aversion or hatred for the sound is intensified.  (Phonophobia is a fear of sounds.  Hyperacusis is a hypersensitivity to the volume of the sound, where the sound volume causes pain or discoumort.  These may or may not be associated with misophonia.)

 

There is little known about effective cures for misophonia.

 

The cases of misophonia that I have encountered seem to be driven by unpleaasant encounters with family members, especially parents.  The child responds very strongly (and negatively) to criticism and correction.  These strong feelings seem to map onto the sounds from that person.  So when the child hears the parent breathe, chew, or other sound, it is especially irritating (and seems to automatically pull up the negative feelings from previous encounters).  

 

I (Tom Dozier) am particularly interested in working with parents that have a child with misophonia or similar symptoms.  The behavior science parenting skills I teach are well suited to eliminate the coercive/critical interactions, while still allowing the parent to be an effective, responsible parent.  If you have a child with misophonia, or strong, negative reactions to routine sounds or smells, please contact me (see Contact Us at the bottom of the page).  I would like to hear your story to gain a more complete understanding of this "disorder".  I also firmly believe that a behavioral intervention has the best change of making a real positive impact on this troubling problem.

 

If you have a child with misophonia, or strong, negative reactions to routine sounds or smells, please contact me (see Contact Us at the bottom of the page).  I would like to hear your story to gain a more complete understanding of this "disorder".  I also firmly believe that a behavioral intervention has the best change of making a real positive impact on this troubling problem.

 

Please take a few mintues and go to www.misophonia.us to take a brief survey about misophonia.  There is one survey for adults with misophonia and another for parents of chilren with misophonia.